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Thursday, January 10

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  2. page Individual Student Page edited chetch - owner chetchison@comcast.net - student
    chetch - owner
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Saturday, April 18

  1. page 10-SocialNetworks edited Social Networking in Education? You Bet! Introduction {cartoon-gapingvoid-network-ms2126.jpg} …

    Social Networking in Education? You Bet!
    Introduction
    {cartoon-gapingvoid-network-ms2126.jpg} image by Hugh MacLeod @ Gaping Void
    image by Hugh MacLeod @ Gaping Void
    A social network is an online environment in which people connect around relationships, content, shared interests and ideas. During this course, we have already encountered a number of sites and tools that incorporate social features such as tagging, commenting, user profiles and online groups, to add value. Human beings have always been social learners, and, increasingly, we learn in digital networks as well as "real-life" networks.
    Networked learning is based on the belief that when one of us gets smarter, we all do. When used effectively, online social networking can play a powerful role in both classroom and lifelong learning. As Steve Hargadon describes, "'Social Networks' are really just collections of Web 2.0 technologies combined in a way that help to build online communities."
    You have probably heard of mainstream, massive, youth-oriented sites such as MySpace and Facebook. You may even use these sites (or similar ones) personally or professionally, or, like many "skeptics," you may view them as, at best, a waste of time and, at worst, a sign of the decline of civilization. Whatever your view, your students (especially in grades 5-up) are definitely connecting via social networking sites and, increasingly, so are professionals, parents, hobbyists, educators, social activists, and all manner of people and groups looking to share, build and organize around content, conversation and ideas.
    A recent study by the National School Board Association, entitled "Creating & Connecting: Research and Guidelines on Online Social -- and Educational -- Networking" found that that 96% of kids ages 9-17 with Internet access have used social networking technologies, and that 50% have used those technologies to talk specifically about schoolwork. The final report (only nine pages with lots of graphics -- not required, but definitely worth a read), in addition to presenting some really interesting findings, offers guidelines and recommendations for school boards regarding the uses of social networking in schools. It's worth considering -- if we don't model productive, responsible uses of social networking tools for our students, how will they learn to be productive, responsible users of these tools?
    As usual, a word from our friends at CommonCraft - "Social Networking in Plain English" (1:47)
    Discovery Exercise
    Explore uses of Social Networking in Education.
    In early 2007, Steve Hargadon created Classroom 2.0, a Ning social networking site for educators "interested Web 2.0 and collaborative technologies in the classroom." The site currently has over 21,000 members sharing ideas and resources, asking questions and discussing ideas and concerns about using these new technologies to support teaching and learning. Exploring this site is a good way to learn more about Web 2.0, and to get a feel for how a social networking site can be used in education.
    You may want to join the Classroom 2.0 network to explore its resources.
    Tips for finding your way around Classroom 2.0
    Forum - (click Forum tab at the top of the page). Here you will find discussion categories with threaded discussions under each. Find a couple of discussions that interest you and read some of the posts and replies.
    Groups - (click Groups tab at the top of the page). Here you will find special-interest discussions and resource sharing. Members interested in the topic can join the group and participate in the discussion. Find a group that interests you and explore the discussions and other content for the group.
    Tags - (right sidebar on Main page) Click a link to find all discussions tagged by tool, subject or area. Or click a tag anywhere within the site (e.g. at the bottom of a discussion post) to view all resources tagged as such.
    Members - (click Members tab at the top of the page). Click any member's profile picture to view his or her personal page, including their groups, discussion postings, personal blog, comment wall, friends and other self-selected content.
    Latest Activity - (left sidebar of Main page) See the most recent activity by all members of the site.
    Videos - (click Videos tab at the top of the page). View videos uploaded and shared by site members.

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    4:07 am
  2. 4:02 am
  3. page 9-GoogleDocs edited ... Discovery Exercise: Explore Google Docs Google Docs: http://docs.google.com ¤ NOTE: The bes…
    ...
    Discovery Exercise: Explore Google Docs
    Google Docs: http://docs.google.com
    ¤ NOTE: The best time to complete the PART 1 exercise may be the next time you have a REAL need to use Microsoft Word to create a document (unless you are under inordinate stress/pressure). I am asking you to share the document, so it's probably best if it's not something sensitive.
    ¤ SHARING NOTE: You may want to begin a document and invite one or more participants as collaborators so that you can work on it together. A single collaborative document can "count" for each person's completion of this exercise, as long as everyone contributes to the document.
    PART 1: (~15-30 minutes) Log into Google Docs using your Google (Gmail) username and password. Create
    Create a new
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    4:01 am
  4. page 9-GoogleDocs edited Online Office: Getting Started with Google Docs Introduction One of the "hallmarks" …

    Online Office: Getting Started with Google Docs
    Introduction
    One of the "hallmarks" of Web 2.0 technology is the idea of the Internet becoming not just "a place we go," but an application, allowing users to perform "software" tasks (such as word processing and image editing) online, inside a web browser. Probably the best example of this trend is the development of several online office suites, including ThinkFree, Zoho Office and Google Docs, which allow users to create documents, spreadsheets and presentations online, for free.
    Google Docs in Plain English from our friends at CommonCraft
    What's all the fuss?
    While it doesn't include every advanced feature of traditional desktop office software, Google docs has many attractive features including some that traditional desktop software can't match. And they are always adding new features. Here are a few of the highlights.
    It's free. Microsoft office costs a home user about $300, a student or teacher at least $100.
    It's easy. If you are familiar with the basic toolbar functions in Word, Excel and Powerpoint, you should find Google Docs fairly intuitive to navigate..
    Documents are stored online and accessible from any computer. There is only one copy of each document, and you can never lose it.
    It's compatible with Microsoft Office (and other file formats), allowing importing/uploading of existing documents, spreadsheets and presentations, and downloading/exporting of files to edit in Microsoft Office.
    It's collaborative. Share documents with other users and edit them simultaneously! One useful classroom application would be for a teacher to give feedback on a student essay or paper within the Google doc, rather than on a printed version. Also great for peer-editing.
    It offers built-in revision history. Google saves every version of a document with a time stamp and username (like a wiki), allowing users to
    Compare any two versions of a document, seeing exactly what has changed.
    Know precisely which content was contributed by each user. (e.g. teachers can evaluate and track student contributions over time).
    Easily revert to an old version at any time.
    Chat feature: Google spreadsheets allows users to discuss a file while working on it. Google presentations allows viewers to discuss the presentation while watching it online!
    Instant forms: Create a survey, poll or other form and email it to selected respondents, or publish it to the web and send the link to desired participants. Results are instantly stored in a Google spreadsheet.
    Many sharing and publishing options.
    Documents can be public or private (unshared); Collaborators may be invited as editors or only as viewers.
    Documents may be Published to the web for viewing as a web page. Simply share the URL on a website or in email.
    Spreadsheets and presentations are embeddable in other web pages (such as wikis).
    When you make changes to a Published document, the Published version updates automatically when the document is saved.
    Use Google docs as a simple way to create web pages that share links (Example - Peek's Page)
    Track changes to any published document via RSS feed.
    Discovery Exercise: Explore Google Docs
    Google Docs: http://docs.google.com
    ¤ NOTE: The best time to complete the PART 1 exercise may be the next time you have a REAL need to use Microsoft Word to create a document (unless you are under inordinate stress/pressure). I am asking you to share the document, so it's probably best if it's not something sensitive.
    ¤ SHARING NOTE: You may want to begin a document and invite one or more participants as collaborators so that you can work on it together. A single collaborative document can "count" for each person's completion of this exercise, as long as everyone contributes to the document.
    PART 1: (~15-30 minutes) Log into Google Docs using your Google (Gmail) username and password. Create a new "word" document Practice using several formatting tools and features. As you explore, consider ways you might incorporate Google Docs into your classroom, professional or personal life.

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    3:59 am
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  6. page 8-VideoShare edited A Tale of Two Tubes - Video Sharing in the Classroom Introduction {http://farm1.static.flickr.…

    A Tale of Two Tubes - Video Sharing in the Classroom
    Introduction
    {http://farm1.static.flickr.com/215/465666536_745428de4e_m.jpg} photo by largeprime
    photo by largeprime
    Teachers have been using video to supplement classroom instruction for decades. Online video sharing is big business, and it makes classroom video use cheaper, more convenient, and more customized, as long as you can find quality content amidst the junk. Like other Web 2.0 tools, video sharing sites enable users (for better or worse) to easily publish content to the web. YouTube, the most popular video sharing site on the web, currently garners about 200 million visitors a day.
    As you explore YouTube and its "education-oriented" companion, TeacherTube, you will encounter many familiar Web 2.0 features, such as RSS feeds, user comments/ratings, groups, and, of course, tags. Like many resource-rich websites, much of the content on YouTube is not school appropriate. The comments are unfiltered, so even a perfectly benign and educational video can have reams of inane text posted below it. But there is a wealth of "good" stuff on YouTube, so it's definitely worth a look. (Plus, now that you know how to EMBED, you can present JUST the video content you choose to students, without visiting the YouTube site directly! See the HELP Video!)
    And, yes, copyright questions abound.
    Discovery Exercise
    PART 1: YouTube Scavenger Hunt
    If YouTube is blocked at your school, you will probably need to do this at home. To bring YouTube content to your classroom in a blocked setting, you can use the free Zamzar service to download and convert a video for offline use. (Zamzar Quick Reference)
    Your challenge is to find four videos:
    Find two videos that relate to your teaching content and/or professional learning interests.
    Find one video that teaches you "how to" do something -- ride a bike, knit a sweater, bake a pie -- whatever you like. (Will Richardson recently told us that you can find out how to do most anything technological by searching YouTube!)
    Find one video that's just fun, nostalgic or interesting to you.
    PART 2: Explore TeacherTube (YouTube "alternative" for Education)
    TeacherTube, launched in March 2007, aims to provide a "more educationally focused, safe venue for teachers, schools, and home learners" to share instructional videos and student media projects. TeacherTube currently offers free unlimited uploading of educational video. TeacherTube relies on its user community to keep the site student-safe by flagging inappropriate content. (Personal disclaimer: While I love the idea of TeacherTube, its frequent site slowness and barrage of advertising bug me.
    Please check out TeacherTube with an eye for PRODUCING content. Possibly the most powerful potential for video sharing to support teaching and learning is to contribute original content -- make your students into teachers! What types of projects might you or your students contribute to TeacherTube?

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    3:54 am
  7. page 7-SocialBook edited Social Bookmarking with Delicious Introduction Delicious is a popular social bookmarking site …

    Social Bookmarking with Delicious
    Introduction
    Delicious is a popular social bookmarking site (of which there are dozens) that allows Internet users to store all of their saved websites (a.k.a. "favorites" or "bookmarks") online, so that they are accessible from any Internet-enabled computer. Users can organize their sites using tags (user-defined keywords), and descriptions. The "social" aspect comes from the fact that users' bookmarks and tags are publicly browsable and searchable. Users can also subscribe to others' bookmark collections or to specific tags to create a personal resource network. Delicious tags are an example of a folksonomy, or user-created organizational structure.
    Here's Social Bookmarking in Plain English (3:24), from our best friends at CommonCraft:
    A Few Delicious Features
    Import all your existing bookmarks (a.k.a favorites) from your browser with a few clicks.
    Access (and add to) your bookmarks from any computer! Never lose another link, email links to yourself, or paste into a document for sharing access.
    Discover great resources saved by millions of delicious users with a keyword search, or by browsing specific tags or individual user collections. Try searching Delicious as an alternative to Google when looking for resources for a particular topic.
    Mark any bookmark as private by selecting "do not share" when you save it. (Only YOU will see these sites when you are logged into delicious).
    Let others do the work for you!
    Add users to your Network (click "Add to my Network") to automatically track all their sites (displayed on a separate page from your own). You can also share/recommend a site to any user who is in your Network (such as a colleague!)
    Subscribe to a specific tag (go to Tags > My Subscriptions > Add a Subscription) to receive all users' sites saved with that tag (or even narrow your subscription to a specific user and tag).
    Display your own and others' bookmarks as a list or in a cloud, sorted by tag name or count (frequency of use). The larger a tag appears in the cloud, the more times that tag has been used.
    Easily share and collect bookmarks with others!
    Share all your bookmarks with students or colleagues by giving them a single URL for your delicious username
    (e.g. http://delicious.com/lottascales).
    Share sites for a specific tag (i.e topic) by providing the link for that tag only, (e.g. http:delicious.com/lottascales/digital_storytelling -- where the user is lotta_scales and the tag is digital_storytelling).
    Subscribe to the RSS feed of a specific user, tag or user/tag combination in your RSS reader, or display the feed results on a blog, wiki or other webpage to share with students or colleagues.
    Five ways of "looking at bookmarks" in delicious:
    (If you take a moment to look at the structure of each link, it's easy to see how delicious is organized).
    by User: http://delicious.com/lottascales (all sites saved by user 'lottascales')
    by Tag: http://delicious.com/tag/web2.0 (all sites tagged 'web2.0' by all users)
    by Tag Intersection: http://delicious.com/tag/web2.0+podcast (a "Tag Intersection" combines two or more tags to refine/narrow a search. This link displays all sites tagged with both 'web2.0' and 'podcast' by all users).
    by User/Tag combination: http://delicious.com/lottascales/web2.0 (all of 'lottascales' sites tagged 'web2.0')
    by User/Tag Intersection: http://delicious.com/lottascales/web2.0+podcast(all of 'lottascales' sites tagged with both 'web2.0' and 'podcast')
    A Few "High Profile" Ed Tech Delicious Users (Not a Representative Sample)
    Will Richardson - http://delicious.com/willrich
    David Warlick - http://delicious.com/dwarlick
    Vicki Davis (coolcatteacher) - http://delicious.com/brightideasguru
    Alan Levine - http://delicious.com/cogdog
    David Jakes - http://delicious.com/djakes
    Wesley Fryer - http://delicious.com/wfryer
    Sheryl Nussbaum-Beach - http://delicious.com/snbeach50

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    3:43 am
  8. page home edited Discovery Exercises and Tasks This course is divided into 4 face-to-face workshops, with an option…
    Discovery Exercises and Tasks
    This course is divided into 4 face-to-face workshops, with an optional 5 session for on-your-own exploration. You can select those workshops that best meet your needs. During each workshop, you will complete Discovery Exercises and Tasks ("Things"), as listed below. Remember, you are in charge of your learning journey. This course is about exposure, exploration and experimentation.
    ...
    23 Things" http://k12learning20.wikispaces.com/23Things( 4/2009)http://k12learning20.wikispaces.com/23Things
    Click the link to view details for each "Thing."
    ...
    District 2009-2010 SCHEDULE)SCHEDULE
    Session 1 - Introduction
    Thing 1 Introduction- Learn a bit about Web 2.0, and Why it Matters
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    3:39 am

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